Veterans Memorials

Compiled in March 2009 by
the Manchester Historical Society, VFW, and Veterans Council
for the State of Connecticut Directory


Revolutionary War Revolutionary War Memorial Fountain
Center Memorial Park, near intersection of Center and Linden Streets

Orford Parish Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) honored the Revolutionary War veterans by installing a fountain at the center of town. Charles Adams Platt, noted architect and artist, designed the fountain, the original drawings for which are at Columbia University Library.

The DAR gave the fountain to the Town on July 9, 1921. The fountain was moved from its original location - the intersection of Center and Main Streets - to the Hartford Road/Main Street terminus, then to the Bunce School on Olcott Street, then to the Town highway garage, and finally back to Center Memorial Park, about 1975.

It has been damaged over the years, and the sphere on the top doesn't match the rest of the material. It no longer has plumbing for use as a fountain. Note that the inscription refers to veterans from Orford Parish, rather than Manchester, because it was not until 1823 that Manchester was incorporated as a town separate from East Hartford.


Civil War Civil War Monument
Center Memorial Park, near intersection of Center and Main Streets

In 1876, Center Memorial Park, known as Monument Park at the time, was chosen for the site of a Civil War monument. The statue of a young soldier was dedicated in 1877 on the fifteenth anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862.

Antietam, Maryland was the site of the first major Civil War engagement on Northern soil, and the bloodiest single-day battle in American history. Lettering on the bottom of the statue: "In Memory of the soldiers of Manchester who died in the war of the Rebellion, 1861-1865." The artist Charles Conrads sculpted the bronze statue, which was "supplied by James Batterson, cast at George Fischer & Brother, and set upon a granite pedestal quarried in Rhode Island." Volume 59 of the Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin, calls the statue, "an example of work such as is seldom found elsewhere."

The statue was turned in 1965 to face the intersection, and is visible to traffic at the center of town. Formerly it faced into the park, and its back faced the intersection. The statue was refurbished and rededicated in 2005.


Spanish American War Spanish American War Monument
Center Memorial Park, east of the Probate Court at 66 Center Street, near intersection of Center and Main Streets

May have been erected by the Cheney family. Dedicated to the "Boys of Manchester, Connecticut, who volunteered and served their country in the Spanish American War." Inscribed: "Ward Cheney Camp, No. 13, U.S.W.V. Cuba, Philippine Islands, Portorico, U.S.A. Spanish War Veterans 1898-1902."

Each Memorial Day, during a ceremony after the parade, all the memorials in Center Memorial Park are decorated with wreaths by Manchester's Permanent Memorial Day Committee.


World War I MMH World War I World War I Monument and Manchester Memorial Hospital
71 Haynes Street, off Main Street

After World War I, a hospital was built in memory of the veterans of what was known as the Great War. The 1918 Spanish influenza had struck the United States hard, affecting about one in four Americans.

Manchester established a temporary emergency hospital at Cheney Hall, and in 1919, C. Elmore Watkins headed a community campaign to construct a hospital. It raised over $165,000 in less than a week.

In 1920 Manchester Memorial Hospital opened, dedicated to the 45 Manchester men who lost their lives in World War I. The inscription on the plaque in the lobby of the hospital (left of the two pictures) reads, "This hospital is dedicated to the men and women of Manchester who served their state and country during the World War of 1914 to 1918.

The monument in front of the hospital (right of the two pictures) was dedicated in 1933 and is inscribed: "This tablet is erected in memory of these men of Manchester who made the supreme sacrifice in the World War 1917-1918."

In 1970, the hospital was rededicated as a memorial to veterans of all wars.


World War II (a) World War II Memorial Plaque
inside Manchester High School, 134 East Middle Turnpike

The high school building opened in 1957, which may be around the time that this plaque was installed. The large plaque is inscribed with the names of all those who served their country during World War II. The plaque is on the wall of the high school's Bailey Auditorium lobby.


World War II (b) World War II Memorial Monument
Munro Park, intersection of East Center and Porter Streets

Inscribed: "In tribute to the men of Manchester who gave their lives in World War II. Erected by the American Legion, 1948."

Note: All the monuments in Munro Park are carved from Barre Gray Granite.


World Wars I and II Memorial Monument
Buckland Cemetery: On Tolland Turnpike, near the intersection of Tolland Turnpike and Buckland Street (adjacent to Manchester Honda)

The granite flag-pole pedestal, which is on the right side of the driveway as you come up the hill into the cemetery, honors veterans from Buckland and Oakland who served in WWI and WWII. Their names are engraved in a metal plaque, set into the ground at the left side of the base of the flagpole in the photo at right. A picture of the plaque is in the photo at far right.


Korean Conflict Korean Conflict Monument
Munro Park, intersection of East Center and Porter Streets

The monument lists the names of four men killed in Korea, with markers on the map of Korea.

Inscribed: "Korean Conflict, 1950-1953, Not Forgotten."


Vietnam War Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Main Street, just south of its intersection with East Center Street

The monument is in a parklet, across the street from the Mary Cheney Library, Downtown Main Street. The polished black granite monument lists the names of those killed in Vietnam.

On the right, below the list of names is inscribed: "We were young We have died Remember us," quoted from The Young Dead Soldiers, by Archibald MacLeish. At the bottom left and right are the dates of the war: 1964 to 1975.

This monument and park were dedicated on Memorial Day 1985.


Vietnam Wall That Heals Vietnam Veterans Memorial: "The Wall That Heals"
Main Street, just south of its intersection with East Center Street

It is placed immediately opposite the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, in the same parklet.
This monument commemorates the 2015 visit of "The Wall That Heals" to Manchester. See the 2015 brochure about The Wall's visit by clicking brochure, for the dedication activities and information on the servicemen inscribed on the Memorial.

"The Wall That Heals" visit and dedication activities took place October 7 thru 11, 2015.


Multiple Wars Memorial to Those Who Served in Several Wars
Munro Park, intersection of East Center and Porter Streets

Monument erected in 1992 by the Veterans Council is inscribed: "Lebanon, Grenada, Panama, Desert-Storm Iraq. To those who served. Bosnia, Somalia. Veterans Council, Veterans Day, November 11, 1992."


Irag / Afghanistan Memorial to Those Who Served in Iraq and Afghanistan
Munro Park, intersection of East Center and Porter Streets

Monument erected by the Veterans Council is inscribed: "Iraq, Afghanistan. To Those Who Served. Veterans Council, Veterans Day, November 11, 2005."


All Who Served (a) Monuments to all who served (a)
East Cemetery, located beginning at intersection of Harrison and East Center Streets.
Each monument is accompanied by a flag pole and flag.

Monument located off Harrison Street, east of the office of the East Cemetery, in the veterans cemetery area. Honoring all veterans, this monument is inscribed: "In honor of the men and women of Manchester who served in the armed forces of our country and its allies. The erection of this memorial was sponsored by the combined veterans organizations of and with the approval of the town of Manchester."


All Who Served (b) Monuments to all who served (b)
East Cemetery, located beginning at intersection of Harrison and East Center Streets.
Each monument is accompanied by a flag pole and flag.

Monument located in the Veterans section near Autumn Street at Wellington Street. Made of Barre gray granite it is inscribed, with an eagle and flag image, "In memory of those who served their country."


All Who Served (c) Monuments to all who served (c)
East Cemetery, located beginning at intersection of Harrison and East Center Streets.
Each monument is accompanied by a flag pole and flag.

Monument located in a Hillside section west of Beth Shalom Cemetery adjacent to Glenwood Street. The monument, of polished black granite, has an image of an eagle with arrows and a wreath, and is inscribed, "In recognition of those dedicated to the service of our country."


Veterans Memorial Bridge Veterans Memorial Bridge
Bridge at Park Street, intersection of Elm Terrace


Veterans Memorial Cemetery Veterans Memorial Cemetery (designated Hillstown Cemetery by the Town)
180 Hillstown Road

This veterans cemetery is in a rural section of Manchester, accompanied by the Veterans Memorial Soccer Field and Rope Course. The monument is inscribed: "Salute to all veterans [then a square with the image POW-MIA with You are not forgotten], To all who served. Veterans Council of Manchester, November 11, 1998." The American flag and the POW-MIA flag fly above the monument, made of Barre Gray Granite.


Digital Directory of Memorials in the State of Connecticut
Click: www.ct.gov/ctva/lib/ctva/memorial_website_page.pdf for a town-by-town listing of Connecticut's veterans memorials.

To read more about Manchester veterans...

• Click Dorothy Olcott to read an interview by Susan Barlow with Dorothy Olcott, who served in the WAVES in World War II.

• Click Harry Maidment to read an interview by Susan Barlow with Harry Maidment, who served in the Army in the artillery during World War II.

• Click Vet Haven to read an interview by Susan Barlow with Ted Cummings, who served with the Marines in World War II and who lived in the Vet Haven housing development after he came home from the war.




Photos from VFW Post 2046, Susan Barlow, John Spaulding, and David Thorstenson.

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